The Continuation School System in Ghana: Revisiting Technical/Vocational Education at its Best

  • Philip Oti Agyen Akenten Appiah-Menka University of Skills Training and Entrepreneurial Development (AAMUSTED), Ghana
  • Matilda Obeng Kyereh Akenten Appiah-Menka University of Skills Training and Entrepreneurial Development (AAMUSTED), Ghana
  • Augustine Owusu Addo Catholic University of Ghana
Keywords: Continuation schools, Adinkra clothes, leatherworks, tailoring, agricultural activities, dress making

Abstract

The study is a historical analysis of the Continuation School System (CSS) in Ghana. An examination of relevant archival data retrieved from the offices of Public Records and Archival Administration Department (PRAAD) in Ashanti and Central Regions in Ghana were scrutinized. Three persons who were identified as having   adequate knowledge of the CSS in the country also provided relevant information to aid the study. In addition, secondary data relating to CSS was also used to enhance analysis of the primary data retrieved. The major findings were that the CSS achieved its main goal of predisposing and equipping its beneficiaries with practical/vocational skills to make them productive in their future lives. However, the CSS policy was abolished with the introduction of the 1987 Educational Reforms in the country. Its total abolition was rather unfortunate since its ultimate goal and that of the New Educational Reforms were somewhat similar. One anticipated that it should have been overhauled to incorporate the new ideals of the New Educational Reforms. In particular, the utilization of the local non-professional artisans as teachers in the CSS could have been maintained to ensure adequate and continuous supply of local expert instructors without incurring much cost.

 

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Published
2023-02-18
How to Cite
Agyen, P., Kyereh, M., & Addo, A. (2023). The Continuation School System in Ghana: Revisiting Technical/Vocational Education at its Best. EDUCATIO : Journal of Education, 7(4), 211-224. https://doi.org/10.29138/educatio.v7i4.1019
Section
Articles